• Humpback whales calve further south than previously thought

    A study that looked at where humpback whales give birth along the coast of Western Australia has shown that the calving grounds extend more than 1000 kilometres further south than currently recognised. The research by IMAS PhD student Lyn Irvine, published in the journal Marine Mammal Science, included aerial...
  • Explaining Antarctic Seafloor Biodiversity

    In a world-first, a research team of Australian and international scientists has used data collected by satellites and an ocean model to explain and predict biodiversity on the Antarctic seafloor. The researchers combined satellite images of phytoplankton colour on the sea surface with a suite of connected models of...
  • Why are there no sea snakes in the Atlantic?

    Sea snakes are an evolutionary success story. With about 70 species, they’re the most diverse reptile group in the ocean, outnumbering sea turtle species 10-to-1. They sport a range of physical adaptations for life at sea, including a flattened oar-like tail for paddling and the abilities to smell underwater,...
  • How a tiny sea animal feeds itself, and the ocean

    Dime-sized ocean organisms thought to graze on any particles in their path are actually picky eaters, and their food-filtering process may be vital to how organic materials are distributed from surface waters to the ocean floor. Those conclusions come from three studies, which involved scuba diving in different locations...
  • Hardy corals make their moves to build new reefs from scratch

    Resilient species of coral can move to inhospitable areas and lay the foundations for new reefs, a study shows. Scientists have discovered that these tough, mobile corals can create their own stable habitats, which act as a base upon which other species can attach and build reefs. These hardy...
  • New study predicts worldwide change in shallow reef ecosystems as waters warm

    A new study based on the first global survey of marine life by scuba divers has provided fresh insights into how climate change is affecting the distribution of marine life. The research published in the journal Science Advances predicts that as the oceans warm fish – which appear to...
  • Sharks longer in the tooth than we thought

    Dr Alastair Harry, a researcher at the James Cook University in Queensland, Australia, has found that the life span of sharks and rays is much longer than was previously understood. Looking at 53 different populations of sharks and rays that scientists had already been intensely studied, Dr Harry found...
  • Debris from the 2011 tsunami carries invasive species across the Pacific Ocean

    by Steven Chown Professor of Biological Sciences, Monash University When a foreign species arrives in a new environment and spreads to cause some form of economic, health, or ecological harm, it’s called a biological invasion. Often stowing away among the cargo of ships and aircraft, such invaders cause billions of...
  • Algae rings on coral reefs indicators of climate change

     October 6, 2017 A research team at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia has discovered that rings in coral reef-building algae could indicate impacts of climate change. The team made the find using state-of-the-art techniques in laboratories at the Griffith University Nathan campus, the Australian National University and the Australian...
  • Whales serve as Antarctic canaries

    Researchers at Griffith University in Australia are using humpback whales as “canaries in the coalmine” to tell them what’s happening in Antarctica. A team lead by Associate Professor Susan Bengtson Nash, of Griffith’s Southern Ocean Persistent Organic Pollutants Program (SOPOPP), has been monitoring the population of humpbacks migrating along the east coast of...