• World’s marine wilderness shrinking

    An international study led by University of Queensland scientists has found that only 13 per cent of the ocean can still be classified as wilderness. Researchers from UQ’s School of Biological Sciences and international collaborators identified marine areas devoid of intense human impacts by analysing 19 stressors including commercial shipping, sediment runoff...
  • Seaweeds shelter calcifying marine life from acidifying oceans

    Seaweeds create a chemical microenvironment at their surface, providing refuge for calcifying organisms that are at risk from decreasing oceanic pH, shows new research published in the journal Functional Ecology. CO2 in the atmosphere dissolves directly into seawater, lowering the pH and making it increasingly acidic. Kelp and other seaweeds...
  • The Mysterious Lives of Narwhals

    Narwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But research being presented at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Monday may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals. New research shows...
  • Debris from the 2011 tsunami carries invasive species across the Pacific Ocean

    by Steven Chown Professor of Biological Sciences, Monash University When a foreign species arrives in a new environment and spreads to cause some form of economic, health, or ecological harm, it’s called a biological invasion. Often stowing away among the cargo of ships and aircraft, such invaders cause billions of...
  • People’s love of the seas could be the key for plastic pollution solution

    Tapping into the public’s passion for the ocean environment could be the key to reducing the threats posed to it by plastic pollution, a new report suggests. Millions of tons of plastic particles accumulate in our seas each year as a result of human behaviour, and once there they...
  • Old fish few and far between under fishing pressure

    Like old-growth trees in a forest, old fish in the ocean play important roles in the diversity and stability of marine ecosystems. Critically, the longer a fish is allowed to live, the more likely it is to successfully reproduce over the course of its lifetime, which is particularly important...
  • Increasing effective decision-making for coastal marine ecosystems

    Marine restoration, rather than protection, might be the most cost-effective solution for coastal marine ecosystems suffering from human activities, a new study has found. The University of Queensland and the Australian Research Council Centre for Excellence in Environmental Decisions study examined how to best benefit coastal marine ecosystems on...